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Articles about The Disposable Film Festival

The Disposable Film Festival's growth comes as the disposable film movement, so called because such films were initially shot on disposable gadgets like one-time-use video cameras, is catching on world-wide.
As people see what others have done with ephemeral video, they build upon it... "When we finish the screening," Mr. Evans said, "everyone feels empowered that they, too, can make a film."
What I like about the DFF is these guys were pioneering this kind of filmmaking way before the arrival of Apple’s iPhone, but are now reaping the benefits of the smartphone era.
This year's festival features a collection of the best disposable films made on everyday devices like cell phones, pocket cameras, and webcams.
Returning to S.F. March 20-23, the seventh annual film festival shows just how far those tiny gadget cameras have come -- gone are the days of pixelated videos, replaced by high-quality footage that no one would guess was shot with an iPhone -- or those weird glasses.
The 7th annual Disposable Film Festival, a showcase of short films made with inexpensive video recording devices, takes place March 20 to 23 in San Francisco.
This year, a special partnership between The Disposable Film Festival and the Mobile Film Festival, a French festival based on the motto "1 Mobile, 1 Minute, 1 Film", will be celebrated.
Evans notes that filmmaking has been repeatedly revolutionized by technology, whether Super8, video or today's digital devices. "When we started the festival seven years ago," he recalls, "we saw mobile video as an experimental platform not unlike the avant-garde of the '70s."
What are you up to these days? These days I'm hard at work with the rest of the DFF folks to make our sixth annual festival as inspirational as it can be. We've got some really great events featuring filmmakers from all over the world.
The festival is a showcase of short films made with inexpensive video capture devices like cell phones and webcams. 
The sixth annual event celebrating low-cost digital filmmaking technology opens with a competitive shorts program at 8 p.m. Thursday at the Castro Theatre, continues with a dinner and screening on food justice at 7 p.m. Friday at J. Rusten Studio.
Their motto is film is too important to leave to the experts and we wholeheartedly agree! 
The Disposable Film Festival, which starts this evening, has staked its remarkably quick six-year success on an uncanny ability to pinpoint, predict, and prepare for the future of film. 
/// 7x7
Disposable kicks off in San Francisco every March before traveling to cities around the world. Check out their events page to find out when they'll be in a city near you.
Now in its sixth year, The DFF goes from strength to strength and has steadily built up a substantial audience (its premiere weekend at the Castro pulls in 4,000 alone), which has attracted sponsors such as Mozilla and Vimeo.
San Francisco has never been short on innovation, and the Disposable Film Festival -- coming to the Castro Theatre this Thursday night -- is no exception.
With our world's amazing technology making spectacular cameras small, cheap and ubiquitous, new types of moviemaking (and, by extension, moviemakers) are proliferating.
Ranging from impressively polished to lovingly crude, the program proves the value of creativity over resources and showcases impressive undiscovered talent.
Disposable Film Festival 2012 attracts most creative entries yet
The Disposable Film Festival is a true pioneer of mobile filmmaking
All the films in the Disposable Film Festival are great examples of how cinema is leaving Hollywood and coming to live in each of our hands.
The Disposable Film Festival screens the year's most rad and riveting (not to mention, resourceful!) short films shot on low budgets and non-pro filmmaking gear.
What lessons can the industry learn from the disposable filmmaker?
Now that there are literally billions of people making media, the best of disposable films are innovating the film industry as a whole.
All the films in the selection were hand-crafted gems made on a shoe-string budget. They represented the diversity and quality of individual artist today.
The technological age has carved a portal for the inflow of creative ideas from zero budget artists who were previously left at the curb. The Disposable Film Festival has coined the phrase "democratization of film" to testify to this transition, but the Festival's cofounder Carlton Evans says putting the future of film into the hands of the masses is only the beginning.
The Disposable Film Festival and YouTube co-presented a special sneak preview screening of Oscar-winning film director Kevin Macdonald's LIFE IN A DAY
/// Twitch
Funny, touching, creative, personal, beautiful and most of all inspirational.
Interview with Disposable Film Festival associate director Katie Gillum
/// ABC-TV
Michael Guillén interviews Disposable Film Festival co-founder Carlton Evans
[The Disposable Film Festival] not only harnesses and nurtures blossoming amateur talent, but also encourages exploration.
[The Disposable Film Festival] seeks the most creative and accomplished shorts produced with amateur image-capture devices.
Says Carlton Evans, director of the Disposable Film Festival, "The films in this year's program are 25 quality films that might otherwise have never been screened in front of a live audience." In the words of Alex Kalman "it's still cinema we're talking about: you have to be damn good."
Après les films à petit budget, voici les "films jetables", une tendance en cinéma qui fait des adeptes jusqu'à Montréal.
It's the drive-in movie that's been disposed of, but it was the Disposable Film Festival which last year popularized (or perhaps debuted) the "bike-in movie," the drive-in's timely replacement in the peak oil-era. In fact, the idea is not a disposable one at all, but a repeatable experiment in audience agency and participation.
Devoted to the art of making movies without using movie cameras, the Disposable Film Festival found the perfect poster child in Memoirs of a Scanner....Carlton Evans explains the disposable DIY aesthetic: "If you have a strong concept, you can take whatever you have and make a film."
Any schnook can shoot lo-res video with a cellphone or Webcam, as you once demonstrated to your (or your lover's) satisfaction (or frustration). In the hands of artists or rabid experimentalists, though, these cheap tools produce some gritty, gripping stuff. The Disposable Film Festival showcases the best work made with nonpro gear.
Coolest Film Festivals: Created in 2007, The Disposable Film Festival offers a democratized space where the work of zero-budget filmmakers is celebrated and exhibited.
With the increasing accessibility of nonprofessional "video capturing devices," as Slatkin calls them, the two believe a new moving image aesthetic has developed.
Slatkin and Evans say, "there is creativity in these ephemeral, on-the-fly images of our accelerated times-and a new artistic medium for both filmmakers and social advocates..."
The Disposable Film Festival responds to the fast and easy media that dominate our social lives; camera-phone party snaps clog Facebook profiles and viral videos burn out on YouTube before they fully flare up. If Marshall McCluhan's famous maxim "the medium is the message" still holds, then this media landscape must hold a pixelated mirror to a vapid, impatient culture...The resulting work offers commentary that's anything but superficial on the ephemeral nature of art in the age of YouTube.
Slatkin and Evans say, "there is creativity in these ephemeral, on-the-fly images of our accelerated times-and a new artistic medium for both filmmakers and social advocates..."
With the increasing accessibility of nonprofessional "video capturing devices," as Slatkin calls them, the two believe a new moving image aesthetic has developed.
As people see what others have done with ephemeral video, they build upon it... "When we finish the screening," Mr. Evans said, "everyone feels empowered that they, too, can make a film."
Devoted to the art of making movies without using movie cameras, the Disposable Film Festival found the perfect poster child in Memoirs of a Scanner....Carlton Evans explains the disposable DIY aesthetic: "If you have a strong concept, you can take whatever you have and make a film."
It's the drive-in movie that's been disposed of, but it was the Disposable Film Festival which last year popularized (or perhaps debuted) the "bike-in movie," the drive-in's timely replacement in the peak oil-era. In fact, the idea is not a disposable one at all, but a repeatable experiment in audience agency and participation.
Says Carlton Evans, director of the Disposable Film Festival, "The films in this year's program are 25 quality films that might otherwise have never been screened in front of a live audience." In the words of Alex Kalman "it's still cinema we're talking about: you have to be damn good."
[The Disposable Film Festival] not only harnesses and nurtures blossoming amateur talent, but also encourages exploration.
[The Disposable Film Festival] seeks the most creative and accomplished shorts produced with amateur image-capture devices.
Interview with Disposable Film Festival associate director Katie Gillum
/// ABC-TV

Videos about The Disposable Film Festival

DFF Interviews and Recap

DFF on Bassett.tv

Changing the way films are being made
/// CNET Feature Video

More Press about The Disposable Film Festival

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